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Quick and easy, the EOS RP is, in my opinion, the best bang for the buck digital camera that you can get right now, considering it’s still around December 2020 when you’re reading this. I actually bought this camera for it’s full, original MSRP in February 2019 at $1299, which included the body, a grip, and an adapter for my EF lenses. Even then, I thought this was a stellar deal. Now, although it’s just the body, the EOS RP can often be had for sub-$1000 and even sub-$700 if you buy it certified refurbished on Canon’s website. Keeping in mind its price, here is what the EOS RP has going for it and what it lacks. …


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So you’re getting into film photography for the first time, and you’re just about to pull the trigger on your first purchase. But you’re scared of buying a 40-year old camera that could potentially not work. How do you ensure that you’re buying a film camera that functions properly? You’re in luck because after buying a bunch of used cameras in the last couple of months (thanks, quarantine), I’ve more or less caught onto what to look out for. And I’ve made a lot of mistakes to get to this point. …


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Everyone starts off in a pretty similar manner. You pick up a camera for the first time. You fall in love. It becomes your hobby. You buy more and more gear. Eventually, you even start doing some paid work, and photography becomes either your main form or a form of income for you. But in this standard kind of journey, the magic of photography usually gets lost in the shuffle. Photography was once a fun hobby, but now it’s become work with clients and deadlines and pulling endless nights to finish edits. You’re still passionate about photography, but you’re shooting for the needs of other people, not yourself. That’s why I believe that every experienced photographer, whether your a professional or do professional work, should consider shooting on film or even shooting on film again, in your own free time. …


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The age-old question arises again. Your camera brand of choice just released a new camera. Is it time to upgrade? Should you be content with what you have? Here are some things to consider when thinking about whether you need to upgrade your camera or not.


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I recently read an article on Medium about how a mirrorless camera should not be your next upgrade after having owned DSLRs. Now, I’m not sure whether this author has ever shot on mirrorless, but I’ve never disagreed with an author more. If you ever have the opportunity to shoot and experience a mirrorless camera for an extended period of time, you will almost never want to go back to shooting on a DSLR. For professional work, especially, mirrorless is definitely here to stay, and I have little to no reason to look backward.

And an upgrade to mirrorless is evitable after all. Given many camera brands are only now releasing mirrorless bodies, the end of the DSLR from a manufacturer’s standpoint is very much looming if not already happening. But the future is now, and if you need a new camera, it should be mirrorless. …


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About two weeks ago, I went out and bought my very first film camera, the coveted Canon AE-1. This was probably the most typical choice I could have made when choosing a film camera. But I was already buying FD lenses for adapting on mirrorless, and so buying the AE-1 or the A-1, which only the former was present at the open market, made a lot of sense to me.

I then proceeded to buy the battery and a few rolls of film and instantly got to shooting. There were certainly a lot of things I needed to learn on this camera before I could ever get things right. Having shot on digital, I was so accustomed to the convenience it provided, and so I didn’t understand the gravity of the issues I was really in for when shooting on film. …


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I’ve been obsessed with making a digital photo look like film for the longest time. Trying to replicate the “Film Look” has been something of a secondary photography goal for me during my four year career. Really, what I mean by this is replicating vintage film by observing the traits and characteristics of stocks like Portra 400, Kodak Gold 200, and Ektar 100. But every time I think I got it just right, I look at the photos later and say to myself, “I’m still not quite there yet.”

The sheer truth is that I’ll never be able to replicate film on digital perfectly. I use vintage film lenses. I shoot on film to understand the look. I research other photos people have taken on film. I might be able to fool some people about the true medium I took a photo, but I’ll never get it right each and every time. There’s also a plethora of different stocks to choose from, so is there really even a real “Film Look” people can identify with? …


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A World of Convenience

There are many photo editing preset packs for Lightroom that other photographers are offering for you to buy. And sure, a lot of them give a really easy way to grade your photos without you having to worry. But I’m here to tell you that it’s not worth it to buy these, and depending on them can ruin your creative potential.

I can’t deny that we live in a world that loves convenience. You should definitely, definitely be using presets. Like, absolutely with no doubt about it. It’s okay to make shortcuts for yourself, but there comes a point where sometimes a really short shortcut is making you come up short. And in my opinion, using someone else’s preset is too short of a shortcut. It is more than worth it to create presets for yourself. …


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So You’ve Hit a Wall…

I remember when I first started shooting with my Canon Rebel camera. All I had was that body and the kit lens, the humble beginning many of us know. But I took my camera with me everywhere. I shot everything. I shot everyone. I even shot my friends in the cafeteria during lunch. I really, really loved taking photos, and I still do. But then I started to progress throughout the years. I got jobs and found clients. I bought all the gear and lenses I needed. I started to become everything I was hoping to become.

But then came the point when photography felt less like something of a passion and more like my job, because, well, it was. I was shooting three or fourth days a week. Portraits and performances, portraits and performances. Eventually, I stopped bringing my camera with me when I went out with my friends. They noticed, and I heard “Hey, you’re not bringing your camera out anymore. Are you still shooting?” The answer was yes. I was shooting more than ever actually, but I was shooting because I had to and not because I wanted to. I felt so swamped with my work that photography wasn’t fun. It was becoming a chore. I needed to make photography fun for myself again. …


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If you just got off a portrait session, shot an event, finished covering sports, or got back from days and days of vacation, you probably have anywhere from a few hundred to a few thousand photos you have to look through. You can spend days and days editing and sorting through photos in Lightroom, and that’s why today I’m going to give you tips on saving time in the photo editing workflow. Besides things like learning to use shortcuts, here are 7 steps for a faster and more productive Lightroom editing experience.

#1. Get it Right in Camera First

I understand this is a really big no brainer, but seriously, it’s worth taking the time to consider. Getting things right in camera is essential to speeding up your workflow later. You’ll spend less time having to tweak small mistakes and therefore finish a lot earlier than normal. Here are two examples of things you need to get right in-camera that are going to boost your workflow when you import your photos into Lightroom. …

About

Paulo Makalinao

An avid portrait photographer and media content creator. Currently attending Stanford University. Originally from Matawan, NJ.

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